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The calamity that is Chris Grayling MP – the current Transport Secretary who is best known for signing a contract with a ferry company who has never operated a ferry service and copied and pasted their terms and conditions from a takeaway site – first struck in the Ministry of Justice when he part-privatised probation services.

The cost of this bungle? £173,000,000. I have long argued that these changes would not work and that everything needed to be put back under the control of the UK Government. It was ridiculous to delineate offenders by risk as we all know that people change and someone who is technically low risk can become high risk to the community.

But it is not just me who said that this reform has failed. Her Majesty’s Inspector of Probation, the National Audit Office and the cross-party Justice Select Committee have all stated that this was a failed policy.

As it would happen, the day after Labour secured an Opposition Day Debate on the privatised probation companies and called for them to be nationalised once more the UK Government announced that they would do just that. Common sense has prevailed, but not after Chris Grayling MP cost us all £173million.

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All good policy is based in evidence. Privatising rehabilitation services was based in ideological fervor. At the time I, and the Labour Party, kept telling the UK Government that splitting rehabilitation into a privatised industry which handled ‘low level cases’ and a public which dealt with ‘high risk cases’ was for the birds.

The Justice Committee has been investigating this matter and today I noticed that we had been discussing CRCs for some time and no one had mentioned the role of the Ministry of Justice. What we were told was shocking. There seemed to be no in depth oversight of these private companies and no strategy from the MoJ to ensure that people leaving our criminal justice system could return to society reformed.

To add insult to injury, recently the MoJ pumped money into this failing system as many of these privatised companies said they could no longer operate the service the pledged when bidding for the contract.