By David Hanson MP / Latest News / 0 Comments

Alcohol Units All Add Up – Hanson

Delyn MP David Hanson is backing the new ‘Units’ campaign, aimed at informing drinkers about how many units of alcohol are in their drinks and help them stick to their limits.

The Know Your Limits campaign – the biggest alcohol awareness campaign to date – kicks off its units strand with a series of adverts on TV, radio, billboards and in press, depicting the number of units in individual drinks. The Units campaign has an overall budget of £6 million for 2008/09. It will be followed by a £4 million binge-drinking campaign from the Home Office next month.

The units campaign uses iconic imagery to help people understand how many units are in typical alcoholic drinks, and how to stay within the recommended daily guidelines for regular drinking of 2-3 units a day for women, and 3-4 units a day for men. The campaign will also warn people about how regularly drinking too much can damage their health.

New YouGov poll results out today show that drinkers don’t know exactly how much they are drinking. More than four out of five (82 per cent) claim to know what a unit of alcohol is, yet 77 per cent don’t know how many units are in a typical large glass of wine.

More than half (55 per cent) of those questioned thought a large glass of wine (ABV 12 per cent) would contain two units, when it actually contains three. More than a third (35 per cent) did not know that an average pint of beer (ABV 4 per cent) contains two units, while nearly three out of five (58 per cent) did not know a double gin and tonic also contains two units.

David Hanson said:

“Over recent years beers have got stronger and wine glass sizes have got larger, meaning that many of us have lost track of how much alcohol we are actually consuming.

“The recommended daily guidelines for regular drinking of 2-3 units a day for women, and 3-4 units a day for men.

“I welcome this campaign which will help people to understand how much alcohol their favourite drinks contain and make informed decisions about how much to drink.”